They Fought Like Demons: Women Soldiers in the Civil War (4 Photos)

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They Fought Like Demons: Women Soldiers in the Civil War is a book that document over 250 documented cases of women taking up arms in the civil war.

Popular notions of women during the Civil War center on self-sacrificing nurses, romantic spies, or brave ladies maintaining their home front in the absence of their men. This conventional picture of gender roles does not tell the entire story, however. Men were not the only ones to march off to war. Women bore arms and charged into battle, too. Women lived in germ-ridden camps, languished in appalling prisons, and died miserably, but honorably, for their country and their cause just as men did.

More on the book over at brainpickings.org

To pass as a man, Union soldier Frances Louisa Clayton, who enlisted with her husband in 1861, took up gambling, cigar-smoking, and swearing.

To pass as a man, Union soldier Frances Louisa Clayton, who enlisted with her husband in 1861, took up gambling, cigar-smoking, and swearing.

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Union soldier Albert Cashier, who was really Jennie Hodgers, fought in dozens of battles during the Civil War. In 1913, she made headlines upon being discovered as a woman in an old soldiers home.

Union soldier Albert Cashier, who was really Jennie Hodgers, fought in dozens of battles during the Civil War. In 1913, she made headlines upon being discovered as a woman in an old soldiers home.

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Sarah Rosetta Wakeman

 

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Sarah Edmonds Seelye, one of the best-documented female soldiers, served two years in the Union army as Franklin Thompson and received a military pension 25 years after the war ended.

Sarah Edmonds Seelye, one of the best-documented female soldiers, served two years in the Union army as Franklin Thompson and received a military pension 25 years after the war ended.