Kentucky teen shoots abusive father during domestic dispute (VIDEO)

It’s unknown if the couple had a prior history of domestic disputes. (Photo credit: Lex18)

It’s unknown if the couple had a prior history of domestic disputes. (Photo credit: Lex18)

A domestic dispute in the early morning hours Sunday ended with a Bath County, Kentucky, man in the hospital after apparently being shot by his 17-year-old son, Lex18 reported.

According to a Kentucky State Police news release, they received a phone call at 1:40 a.m. following a domestic dispute involving Tim Anderson, his wife, Shea-la and the couple’s teen son. The state police as well as the Bath County Sheriff’s Department responded to the call.

Officers determined that Anderson had assaulted his wife and son, before the two ran to her father’s house next door.

However, after they left, Anderson simply got in his car and followed them. When he arrived at the house, Shea-la’s father, Jarrod Little, and brother, Josh Little, confronted Anderson and told him that he needed to leave. But Anderson refused the command and then started to drive his car towards the two men. At that point the teen fired several shots at Anderson, hitting him multiple times.

Anderson was transported to a local hospital where he is now listed in stable condition. Shea-la and the teen boy were also taken to a different hospital where they were treated and released for minor injuries.

Kentucky is one of nearly 30 states in the country with a “Stand Your Ground” law.

“Stand your ground is a change in the self-defense defense,” Bourbon County, Kentucky public defender Greg Colson explained in July following the controversy surrounding the George Zimmerman trial. “You always have a right to self-defense, but under the common law if you had the ability to run away or retreat in full safety without risking being injured by the person who is attacking you then you have a duty to that. You have what was called the duty to retreat. The stand your ground law changes that standard. It says if you are in any place that you are legally allowed to be, you don’t have a duty to retreat.”

Under the law, the teen was not obligated to once again run away from his abusive father in an attempt to diffuse the situation. And although no charges have been filed against either party at this point, the incident remains under investigation.