Elementary school student tests knockdown power of shotgun shells for science fair project

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Sixth-grade student Cody Michael Crooks-Saucier explains the data he collected on the knockdown power of shotgun shells from various manufactures.

An elementary school student in Louisiana tested the knockdown power of various shotgun shells for a science fair project last Tuesday.

For the Our Lady of Prompt Succor School Science Fair, 11-year-old Cody Michael Crooks-Saucier wanted to find out which No. 6 2 ¾ inch 12-guage shell packed the most punch at 30 yards. After careful analysis and field-testing of various manufactures, he presented the results in his project titled “Choot ‘Em,’” The Town Talk reports.

Crooks-Saucier hypothesized that with each different brand of shotgun shell came a slight difference in power. To test his theory, he shot two rounds from each different brand at a wooden target he made himself.

He brought his data to the science fair along with a camouflaged board covered in spent shotgun shells.

The winner of the science fair will move on the Louisiana State University of Alexandria on Feb. 22.

According to sixth-grade science teacher Merrilyn Norem, the kids “had a great time doing the project.”

[ The Town Talk ]