SOFREP reveals possible reason U.S. gov’t has yet to release photos of Osama bin Laden’s corpse

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According to a new SOFREP report, the way Osama bin Laden died may be a possible reason the U.S. government has yet to release photos of his corpse.

One possible reason the U.S. government has not yet released photos of Osama bin Laden’s dead body may be because of the way he died, according to the Special Operations Forces Situation Report, a website that covers Special Operations .

Osama bin Laden was shot dead in his Abbottabad compound by SEAL Team Six in the twilight hours of May 2, 2011. According to Matt Bissonnette, one of the operators on the raid, multiple “assaulters” fired rounds into bin Laden’s body after he had already hit the ground, and that may be why the U.S. government has yet to release any post-mortem photos, SOFREP reports.

“In his death throes, he was still twitching and convulsing. Another assaulter and I trained our lasers on his chest and fired several rounds,” Bissonnette wrote in his book, “No Easy Day.” “The bullets tore into him, slamming his body into the floor until he was motionless.”

Two confidential sources told SOFREP that operators took turns “dumping magazines-worth of ammunition into Bin Laden’s body.” By the end of the raid, bin Laden’s corpse was riddled with over a hundred rounds.

SOFREP speculates that while post-mortem photos and video were released of Saddam Hussein and his sons, Uday and Qusay, bin Laden’s many gunshot wounds may be why the U.S. government has kept his photos under wraps.

Jack Murphy, an eight-year Army Special Operations veteran and author of the SOFREP article says, “Now you know the real reason why the Obama administration has not released pictures of Osama Bin Laden’s corpse. To do so would show the world a body filled with a ridiculous number of gunshot wounds.”

To further his point, Murphy explained that the possible legal repercussions of shooting a person excessively may bring scrutiny to other Special Operations missions.

[ SOFREP ]