Dog eats 23 rounds of .308 ammo

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Yum yum yum

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Nothing a little extremely painful poopy can’t fix.

When Larry ‘Sonny’ Brassfield was putting .308 shells away in ammo boxes last month, he didn’t think twice when he ran out of room and put the remaining bullets in a plastic bag and placed it under his bed. After all, his dog, Benno, had eaten his fair share of unusual objects, but in the last four years had never bothered Brassfield’s bullets.

The next morning, Brassfield woke up to a surprise. His wife told him the dog threw up, but that wasn’t it.

“She said there was ammo in the vomit,” he recalled. “I looked at the round and I thought, ‘Oh my God, he got into the ammo.’”

Brassfield watched Benno for about 20 minutes, and when the dog threw up a second time, and upchucked three more rounds, he decided it was time to go to the vet.

An X-ray revealed Benno had devoured 17 rounds of .308 ammo, which could clearly be seen in his stomach, so Dr. Sarah Sexton set out to perform the two-hour surgery to remove it.

“This is something they certainly did not cover in school,” Sexton said. “I’ve had dogs eat things before, mostly stuffed toys. Once I had one swallow a hearing aid, but I think this takes the cake.”

After the surgery was complete, Sexton took another X-ray to examine the dog’s digestive tract, and to everyone’s surprise, found an additional two rounds in his esophagus.

After talking with Brassfield and determining that the ammunition was made of brass and copper, not lead and zinc, they decided not to do another surgery and instead wait to see if the dog passed the ammo on his own. Sure enough, the first round made its way out five days after surgery, the second round followed three days later.

The Baxter Bulletin ]