Canadian gun registry back after program deemed failure (VIDEO)

Twenty-six years ago on Dec. 6, 1989, Canada suffered it’s worst mass shooting in Montreal, Canada.

The Montreal Massacre, as it came to be known, claimed the lives of fourteen innocent women at the hands of a deranged madman who later commit suicide.

Claude Colgan lost his sister Hélène that day.

As you can imagine, the media scrambled to interview friends and relatives of the victims. But when they interviewed Claude’s parents, they were surprised by what they heard.

“My parents told the media that they don’t blame the gun as much as they blame the guy who pulled the trigger. And they told them that they disapproved of the creation of the Canadian Long Gun Registry.”

They never received another interview request from the media after that.

The Colgan’s main question was how the murderer of their little girl was able to buy a gun when he was unable to enlist in the Canadian Armed Forces due to mental health issues.

According to Claude, Hélène wouldn’t have supported the Long Gun Registry either. “She would have been very upset that millions of Canadians have been criminalized just for owning a firearm.”

Five years after the Montreal Massacre, Canada introduced the National Long Gun Registry. Originally forecast to cost two million dollars by the Liberal government, but by 2004, it had ballooned to over two billion dollars.

Claude finds this outrageous; “Two billion, it’s insane. It’s a thousand times more than what was predicted with no hard evidence that it helped reduce crime.”

The Long Gun Registry finally became such an embarrassment that it was shut down by the Conservative government in 2012.

But Canada recently voted the Liberals back into power, and despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau admitting that the long gun registry was a failure, the Quebec Liberal Party announced on Dec. 3 that it would create it’s own provincial gun registry.

They expect it to cost between 15- and 20-million dollars.