Magnum’s Strike Force boot puts hi-tech underfoot

Strike Force

The 6-inch Strike Force boot. (Photo: Eve Flanigan)

The Magnum Boot company is stepping up to high-tech status with an up-and-coming product, the Strike Force boot. For work on and off the range, it’ll be worth a look.

The black leather tactical boot will be available with a 6-inch upper and an 8-inch side zip model. Magnum’s new changes start at the bottom, with a Michelin rubber sole in a tire tread-like pattern. Yes, you can ride on the same rubber as your truck. The prototype shown has a white Michelin logo, which will be removed in production to stay within most departments’ dress codes as well as for tactical soundness.

Moving on up, the midsole is constructed of a very lightweight and soft foam. It looks like it’ll deliver on Magnum’s promise of non-fatiguing comfort. The entire boot is waterproof.

Michelin sole

Michelin treads for your pedestrian ride. (Photo: Eve Flanigan)

What’s truly unique about the Strike Force boot is the ankle protection. Magnum has integrated a circular section of Armourgel, a trademarked substance that can best be described, in its normal state, as something akin to Silly Putty. A perforated (read: breathable) insert of this gel is positioned over the ankle area.

Magnum demonstrates the properties of the mystery substance rather dramatically, by dropping the head of a sledgehammer onto an iPhone screen from a distance of about 3 feet. Without gel, of course, the screen is smashed to bits. With a thin layer of gel atop the phone, the screen is entirely unscathed by the falling hammer. What’s mind-boggling is, the gel hardens instantly on impact, making a perfect protective barrier for the ankle bone. The demo left me wondering why Magnum doesn’t build cars, but maybe that was SHOT Show fatigue setting in.

The Strike Force will retail for around $120 and will be available for direct purchase through Magnum Boots and distributors. Only problem is, you’ll be waiting almost a year until these bionic boots are available to agencies and public customers. Until then, I wouldn’t recommend daring anyone to whack you on the ankle.