Military working dogs go amphibious (5 PHOTOS)

In a pool somewhere in Southwest Asia, a group of military working dogs last week underwent their annual water-based aggression training, just in case.

Although coming across large bodies of water may seem unlikely in the Middle East, there are several marshy and coastal swaths across CENTCOM’s area of responsibility and K9s have to be ready to perform their duties in such an environment should they come across it– because you never know when a wily Daesh foot soldier will try to make a quick get away across a canal or pond. Said terrorist could get 100 pounds of German Shepherd on their back instead of a floatee.

In addition to water familiarization, military working dog handlers said the training allowed dogs and their handlers to strengthen their bonds.

Satie, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog, age 4, prepares to leap from the edge of a pool during annual water-based aggression training at the base pool at undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Jan. 18, 2016. Older, more experienced military working dogs dogs were more proactive in their approach to the training, immediately seeking out the aggressor upon entering the pool area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin)

Satie, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog, age 4, prepares to leap from the edge of a pool during annual water-based aggression training at the base pool at undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Jan. 18, 2016. Older, more experienced military working dogs dogs were more proactive in their approach to the training, immediately seeking out the aggressor upon entering the pool area. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Satie attacks a bite sleeve during annual water-based aggression training. Bite sleeves are leathery training aids worn over the arm by agitators or trainers to protect themselves from injury during bite training with military working dogs. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Satie attacks a bite sleeve during annual water-based aggression training. Bite sleeves are leathery training aids worn over the arm by agitators or trainers to protect themselves from injury during bite training with military working dogs. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Royal Australian Air Force Leading Aircraftman Grady Humphries, assigned to Combat Support Unit 14 and aggressor for the training, engages a tug-of-war contest with Benga, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog, age 5. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Royal Australian Air Force Leading Aircraftman Grady Humphries, assigned to Combat Support Unit 14 and aggressor for the training, engages a tug-of-war contest with Benga, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog, age 5. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Staff Sgt. Kenten, a 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, carries his K9 partner, Pixie, age 3. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Staff Sgt. Kenten, a 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, carries his K9 partner, Pixie, age 3. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Staff Sgt. Anthony, a 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, holds up a rubber ball up for his K9 partner, Dini, age 11. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)

Staff Sgt. Anthony, a 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, holds up a rubber ball up for his K9 partner, Dini, age 11. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Kentavist P. Brackin/U.S. Air Force)