SBTC seeking NRA support for ‘Michael’s Law Amendment’

The Small Business in Transportation Coalition is petitioning the National Rifle Association to support a proposed amendment to a federal statute that would allow Americans to carry firearms with them while traveling between states.

The SBTC has gathered more than 2,500 of the needed 5,000 signatures to send their petition to NRA President Wayne La Pierre, requesting his organization’s endorsement and lobbying of the “Michael’s Law Amendment” to United States Code pertaining to the interstate transportation of firearms, according to the webpage on Change.org.

The proposed change to the law would rename the statute to allow for the interstate possession, transportation and carrying of firearms.

According to the language of the law, “A person who is an American citizen and is not otherwise prohibited by this chapter from possessing, carrying, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm shall be entitled to carry on his person in a loaded, readily-accessible capacity and transport a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place in any state to any other place in a different state in accordance with the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution.”

Under the amendment, states would also be preempted from regulating the transport of legally-possessed firearms “pursuant to the Commerce Clause.”

According to the SBTC, a number of Americans traveling the nation’s interstates each year become the victims of gun violence because they “have no means to protect themselves,” if states don’t grant reciprocity.

They point to several recent instances involving truckers who were victims of gun violence including the law’s namesake — Michael Boeglin, who was killed.

Additionally, they argue that their proposed change would reaffirm the Second Amendment and would pass constitutional challenge, unlike the NRA’s preferred “National Reciprocity” law.

Several pieces of national right-to-carry reciprocity legislation has the support of the NRA, according to the organization’s website.

However, in 2011, Rep. Justin Amash, a Michigan Republican, voted against a national right-to-carry reciprocity, and explained on Facebook that in his view, the law would “improperly” apply the Commerce Clause to concealed carry licensing, which would hurt gun rights.

According to Amash, many of the states in the U.S. have entered into agreements of their own accord to recognize each others carry permits, and the National Reciprocity law would unconstitutionally apply the Commerce Clause to overturn those agreements.

One of the currently proposed national reciprocity laws, H.R. 402, was introduced at the beginning of 2015, and assigned to the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations that February. No further action has been taken.