Schumer cites terrorism concerns over cell phone gun

Schumer wants to lower the boom on cell phone gun citing terrorist concerns

U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-NY, wants an investigation into the Ideal Conceal pistol. (Photo: Kathy Willens/AP)

Ideal Conceal’s innovative .380 that mimics a smart phone when folded has drawn the ire of gun control champion U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer.

The double-barreled derringer designed to resemble a smartphone is set to go on sale in mid-2016 and has a retail price of $395. That is, unless the lawmaker from the Big Apple gets his way.

“Just like toys that too much look like handguns should not be sold, handguns that look too much like toys should not be sold,” said Schumer in a press conference Monday.

The New York Democrat feels the gun was designed to appeal to criminal elements, and is asking the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to investigate Ideal Conceal’s handgun before it is allowed to be sold.

“It’s clearly being marketed for nefarious purposes — 4,000 people are ready to pull the trigger on this dangerous weapon,” Schumer said. “Why would we want to make it easier for criminals or terrorists like those who attacked Paris and Brussels to wreak havoc?”

Ideal conceal holds it has invented a new style of self-defense.

“Looks like a cellphone when folded up, but push the safety and you are ready to defend yourself,” reads their website.

As far as the ATF is concerned, the company has not obtained a written opinion from the Bureau’s Firearms Technology Branch, but as it is a pistol with a rifled bore and cannot be fired in closed position, it would seem to not fall under the purview of the National Firearms Act.

The Stinger, produced from 1990-2004, converted from appearing to be a pen, to a single-shot pistol, and was NFA-compliant

The Stinger, produced from 1990-2004, converted from appearing to be a pen, to a single-shot pistol, and was NFA-compliant

A similar pistol marketed as a novelty gun for nearly 15 years, Bob Braverman’s Stinger Pen Gun was NFA-friendly and ATF-approved to sell as a normal handgun. Mechanically incapable of firing while in its “I’m a pen” mode, the Stinger had to be transformed into a pistol by pulling and pivoting the cylinder on a hinged joint.

Ideal Conceal’s handgun follows much the same principals.

IC last month posted to its social media account that fears of these guns being bought and used against police were unfounded.

“The likely buyer would be somebody with a CCW and wants something he can conceal from the view of an attacker for self-defense,” the company noted. “These types of guns aren’t exactly new, there are wallet holsters on the market where you can put a micro/sub-compact firearm in what looks like a wallet and shoot the gun without taking it from a wallet. These have been around for a long time, but I’ve never heard of people using them against law enforcement.”

Guns.com has reached out to Ideal Conceal and will update this piece if a statement is obtained.