Biden’s 2008 ‘Beretta’ quip revisited after Trump’s ‘2A people’

Donald Trump’s recent quip about “Second Amendment people” has caused quite the kerfuffle, including here on Guns.com, where his ambiguous statement has been the subject of three articles prior to this one.

The keen interest in this bit of bluster that’s typical of the candidate is odd, considering the “aw, shucks,” reaction our nation’s media has adopted to two rather direct comments about criminal behavior with guns recommended by the current Vice President.  More on that in a minute.

Of course, only Trump knows if his statement was meant as a threat to his rival, a mockery of gun rights supporters, or a playful jab.  We’ve pushed our collective need to take sides in this presidential race ahead of the wisdom of seeing things in context.

In its in-depth bio of Trump, the Boston Globe describes his boyhood as one that included trips to construction sites with his father, who got started making prefabricated garages that sold for $50 each.  By the time young Donald was traveling and learning by his father’s side, the business had expanded to plain, practical brick homes and apartment buildings.

Anyone who’s spent time with blue-collar workers can recognize the influence of those workday encounters in Trump’s present-day banter.  The jabs, both light-hearted and cutting, the no-frills speech, and cut-to-the-chase style didn’t come from Wharton Business School, the Ivy League institution from which he holds a degree.  Trump’s critical influences happened much earlier.

Wishfully thinking aloud about eliminating a political opponent is nothing new, nor criminal in casual conversation.  Dumb move for a political candidate? Of course. Dumber not to discuss Trump’s comments in the context of the business in which he operates?  Also yes.

Funny how the same seriousness isn’t given to statements by Joe Biden that specifically advocate what he might, in another setting, call gun violence.  Few Second Amendment supporters will forget his idiotic recommendation to Parents Magazine regarding what he views as the folly of having an AR-15 for protection.  His recommendation:  “get a double-barreled shotgun….if there’s ever a problem, fire two blasts” from the house.  He doesn’t promise to show up to help his fans with their legal defense from the minimum misdemeanor and likely felony charges that can result from taking his advice.

The Bidenism that should really snag media attention is one never discussed.  Keeping with the theme of gun comments that could potentially be construed as threatening, take a look at the video that’s re-emerged from 2008 when Biden was a presidential candidate: Referring to Barack Obama, he states, “If he tries to fool with my Beretta, he’s got a problem.  I like that little over and under, ya know, I’m not bad with it.”

Where was, and is, the outrage over these apparent encouragements of wrongdoing?  What, they were forgiven considering the personality behind the statements?  It appears that what’s yellow versus what’s delicious in this bag of rhetoric depends on what gala one is attending.

The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the position of Guns.com.