Austrian firearm maker Ritter & Stark debuts SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle

ritter & stark

The SX-1 MTR by Ritter & Stark features interchangeable barrels and modularity designed to aide operators in the field and on the range. (Photo: Ritter & Stark)

New firearm manufacturer, Ritter & Stark, announced the arrival of its very first firearm called the SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle.

Chambered in .308 Win, .300 Win Mag or .338 Lapua, the SX-1 MTR was designed with modularity in mind. The rifle is fully customizable, with adjustable cheek rests, recoil pads and left or right folding buttstock capabilities. In addition, aftermarket magazines, triggers and pistol grips can be added to fine tune the rifle to specific preferences.

Barrels are also interchangeable and can be swapped out to fit shooter or mission needs. A 1913 Picatinny rail rests directly on each barrel. Ritter & Stark say this set-up allows for easier swapping in the field.

“The MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail is installed directly on the barrel, allowing barrel interchangeability with pre-set scopes for no shift of impact when changing calibers,” a statement from the company said.

Using a CNC-controlled electrochemical machine, the SX-1 MTR barrel making process aims at limiting mechanical stress or thermal effects on the barrel. This ensures a uniform, match-grade barrel for shooters. The barrel comes in either a fluted or bull-barrel configuration.

Reliability and accuracy are paramount for the Austrian based company. The SX-1 uses a bolt locked directly into the barrel breech for better shots on target. Ritter & Stark touts accuracy up to 5,000 rounds for the .308 Win and .338LM and 2,000 rounds for .300WM. Ultimately, the setup translates to .05 MOA with three round groups using factory match grade ammo.

The .308 is the smallest of the three models, weighing in at 12.81 pounds and with a barrel length of 24.5 inches. Both the .300 Win and .338 Lapua tip the scales at just over 13 pounds and with 27.15 inch barrels.

Ritter & Stark told Guns.com that preliminary U.S. pricing is set at $5,555 for the .308 and $6,555 for the .300 and .338. An official shipping date has not been set by the company.

The rifle is set to make its first public debut at the Association of the United States Army annual meeting in Washington, D.C. in early October.