U.S. tops global market in weapons sales

President Barack Obama with Saudi King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz al-Saud. (Photo: White House)

President Barack Obama with Saudi King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz al-Saud. (Photo: White House)

The U.S. ranks first in arms sales for 2015 with $40.2 billion in weapons sold to other countries, according to a congressional study published this month.

The U.S. took 50.29 percent of arms transfer agreements to both developed and developing nations with the value of all such agreements valued at $79.9 billion.

According to the Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations study, weapons suppliers primarily focused on developing countries for foreign arms sales. In 2015, such agreements were valued at $65.2 billion, but deliveries totaled $33.6 billion.

The U.S. held 41 percent of agreements with developing nations, valued at $26.7 billion, and delivered 35.42 percent of all such agreements. For buyers, Qatar ranked first among developing nations spending some $17.5 billion, Egypt second with $11.9 billion, and Saudi Arabia third with $8.6 billion.

From 2008 to 2015, developing countries comprised of 80.39 percent of all arms agreements worldwide with a slight increase in 2015 at 81.70 percent.

The study showed from 2012-2015 that the U.S. and Russia led in the global arms market. The U.S. made nearly $86 billion by taking 33.38 percent of agreements while Russia made $48.6 billion with 18.94 percent of agreements.