Remember the Auto Glove electric trigger finger? ATF says, nope

While the makers contend the ATF's logic for determining the AutoGlove is a machine gun, they will not fight the decision. (Photo: AutoGlove)

While the makers contend the ATF’s logic for determining the AutoGlove is a machine gun, they will not fight the decision. (Photo: AutoGlove)

Federal regulators have pulled the plug on the planned $350 glove containing a plunger-activated electric motorized trigger finger.

Designed as a “trigger actuation device” that does not permanently attach to a gun, the AutoGlove made headlines earlier this summer. The fully contained TAD used a battery pack that attached to the wrist or forearm to mechanically manipulate the trigger at variable speeds to include single, three-round, or continuous fire at rates past 1,000 rounds per minute.

However, as noted by the company, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives tested the AutoGlove and issued a determination letter last week that the device “may not be used or possessed by individuals” and is considered a machine gun under the National Firearms Act.

AutoGlove has stopped taking orders and is issuing refunds for those who have paid for the device already. A small start-up, the manufacturer says they do not have the resources to fight the determination.

“While we respectfully disagree with the ATFs determination, as the AutoGlove was not tested in accordance with our design criteria or provided instructions/limitations, we will NOT appeal the ATFs determination,” says a statement posted by the company.

“As we have always stated, it was never our intention to thumb our nose at the ATF or NFA regulations, we were simply trying to develop a device that could work within the existing construct of the laws to create a device that could assist a person with pulling the trigger rapidly, whether it be a paintball gun, nail gun, or firearm,” says AutoGlove.

The first run production of the device was to begin this month.