Military vehicles galore at Battlefield: Vegas (30 PICS)

Veteran owned and operated Battlefield: Vegas claims to be the ‘Ultimate Machine Gun Experience’ in the City of Sin. Five years after opening it’s doors in 2012, it has expanded to include a fleet of Humvees that are used to transport tourists and civilians alike, to and from the range, to put a few rounds through some of its 600 fully automatic machine guns.

Battlefield: Vegas has also been adding military vehicles to it’s static display in the parking lots around the range. There’s now approximately two dozen vehicles on display. Many of them function, including an Abrams M1A1 tank that can be rented to crush a car.

Here are some of the fascinating vehicles on display at Battlefield: Vegas for free.

The Battlefield: Vegas street sign that lights up with shells being ejected. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Battlefield: Vegas main shop entrance. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Tourists arrive at Battlefield: Vegas in a Humvee. (Photo: Ben Philippi / Guns.com)

One of the Humvees used to pick up customers. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Signs at the entrance to Battlefield: Vegas. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Vietnam-era UH-1C ‘Huey’ helicopter on display at entrance. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M3A1 Armored Scout Car was an armored car in U.S. service during World War II. It was also known as the White Scout Car, after its manufacturer the White Motor Company. It was used in various roles, including patrol, scouting, command vehicle and ambulance. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

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British FV433 Self Propelled Artillery. The FV433 Field Artillery self-propelled ‘Abbot’ is the self-propelled variant of the British Army FV430 series of armored fighting vehicles. They use the same chassis of the FV430 but with a fully rotating turret and at the rear, housing of the 105mm gun and given the vehicle designation FV433. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Russian T-55 main battle tank. The T-54/55 tanks are a series of Soviet main battle tanks introduced just as the Second World War ended. The first T-54 prototype appeared in March 1945 and entered full production in 1947. It became the main tank for armored units of the Soviet Army, armies of the Warsaw Pact countries and many others. T-54s and T-55s were involved in many of the world’s armed conflicts during the late 20th century. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M901 ITV. The M901 Improved TOW Vehicle is an armored vehicle introduced into service in 1979, and designed to carry a dual M220 TOW missile launcher. It is based on the ubiquitous M113A2 Armored Personnel Carrier chassis. The M901 ITV is no longer in front line service with the U.S. Army but continues to serve around the world. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Tourists walk by a pair of German Leopard 1 MBT tanks at Battlefield: Vegas. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

German Leopard 1 MBT tanks. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Canadian Sexton MKII Self Propelled Artillery. The Sexton was a self-propelled artillery vehicle of World War II. It was based on Canadian-built versions of the American M3 Lee and M4 Sherman tank chassis. In 1941, Canadian production lines began to produce the Sexton to give the British Army a mobile artillery gun using their Ordnance QF 25 pounder gun-howitzer, which could fire a 25lb HE shell or an amour-piercing shell. It found use in the Canadian and British Army, as well as numerous other British Empire and associated forces. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. H-34 Transport Helicopter. The Sikorsky H-34 is a piston-engined military helicopter originally designed by American aircraft manufacturer Sikorsky as an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft for the U.S. Navy. It has seen entered use when adapted to turbine power by the British licenses as the Westland Wessex and Sikorsky as the later S-58T. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Russian D-44 Anti-tank Gun. The D-44 85mm anti-tank gun was used after World War II. It was designed as the replacement for the larger 100mm field gun M1944. Distinguishing features of the D-44 include a very long barrel and a pepper-pot muzzle brake. The D-44 was itself replaced in the 196-s by the T-12 anti-tank gun. Th gun fires a high velocity armor-piecing tracer BR-372 projectile at 1040 meters per second and can penetrate 185mm of armor at a range of 1000 meters at an angle of obliquity of 90 degrees. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

British FV433 Self Propelled Artillery. The FV433 Field Artillery self-propelled ‘Abbot’ is the self-propelled variant of the British Army FV430 series of armored fighting vehicles. They use the same chassis of the FV430 but with a fully rotating turret and at the rear, housing of the 105mm gun and given the vehicle designation FV433. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Canadian Sexton MKII Self Propelled Artillery. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. LMTV M1078 Light Utility Vehicle. In 1991, the Stewart & Stevenson company was awarded a large-scale contract to manufacture the U.S. Army’s new family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) with the intention that eventually all the existing (and aging) medium trucks in the army’s inventory would be replaced by a modern and efficient design. First introduction vehicles were delivered to the U.S. Army in 1996. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M561 Amphibious Off-Road Vehicle. The ‘Gama Goat’ as it was called, was a six-wheel-drive semi-amphibious off-road vehicle originally developed for use by the U.S. military in the Vietnam War. The ‘Goat’ used an articulated chassis, so that from distance it appears to be a four-wheel drive vehicle pulling a two-wheel trailer, but it is a single six-wheel vehicle with a four-wheel steering arrangement with the front and rear wheels turning in the opposite directions. It was famous for its ability to travel over exceptionally bought and muddy terrain. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M1A1 Abrams tank. The Abrams is a 3rd generation main battle tank. It is named after General Creighton Abrams. Despite weighting 62 tons, making it one of the heaviest main battle tanks in service, it is highly mobile. Designed for modern armored ground warfare, the Abrams is well armed and heavily armored. It features a powerful multifuel turbine engine, the adoption of sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

British FV161 Light Armored Truck. The ‘Humber Pig’ is a lightly armored truck used by the British Army from the 1950s until the early 1990s. The ‘Pig’ saw service with the Royal Ulster Constabulary from 1958 until early 1970. The ‘Pig’ became particularly well-known for it’s presence on the streets of Northern Ireland during the worst of the Troubles. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M923A2 Cargo Truck. The M939 is a series of 5-ton 6×6 military heavy tucks. The basic cargo versions were designed to transport a 10,000 pound cargo over all terrain in all weather. Designed in the late 1970s to replace the M39 and M809 series of trucks, it has been in service ever since. The M939 evolved into its own family of cargo trucks, prime movers and recovery vehicles, with about 32,000 in all produced. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M548 Tracked Cargo Carrier. The M548 is a tracked cargo carrier that first entered service in 1982. It is based on the M113 armored personal carrier, and was built by FMC Corp. in San Jose, California. A number of the M548 variants were developed and fielded, including minelayer, recovery vehicle, various radar carriers and missile launchers. A stretched version with 6 road wheels was also used. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M548 Tracked Cargo Carrier. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M35A2 Cargo Truck. The M35 2 1/2-ton cargo truck is a long-lived 2 1/2-ton 6×6 cargo truck initially used by the U.S. Army and subsequently utilized by many nations around the world. Over time, it evolved into a family of specialized vehicles. It would not only inherit the World War II GMC CCKW’s famous ‘Deuce and a Half’ nickname, but also forge it’s own legacy. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M-56 Self Propelled Anti-tank Gun. The M-56 was manufactured from 1953 to 1959 by the Cadillac Motor Car Division of General Motors for use by the U.S. airborne forces, though the vehicle was eventually used by the Spanish Navy Marines, Morocco and the Republic of Korea as well. With a crew of four (commander, gunner, loader and driver), the M56 weighed 17,000 pounds combat-loaded. It had infrared driving lights but no nuclear, biological or chemical protection systems and it was not amphibious. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

U.S. M-56 Self Propelled Anti-tank Gun. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Customers booking some trigger time at Battlefield: Vegas. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Some of the approximately 600 machine guns available for customers to fire at Battlefield: Vegas. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)

Some of the approximately 600 machine guns available for customers to fire at Battlefield: Vegas. (Photo: Ben Philippi/Guns.com)