Benelli Super Vinci

Description

The Benelli Super Vinci is a semi-automatic hunting shotgun chambered in 12 gauge. It’s named after the famous Italian Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci because, Benelli says, like da Vinci, the Vinci is an innovator. What makes the Super Vinci different from the Vinci is the Super can fire magnum loads. Otherwise they’re identical. Vinci shotguns uses Benelli’s Inertia Driven System where recoil energy cycles the action. The bolt is semi-fixed until the backwards force, vibrating through the gun, arrives to the bolt housing, the vibration rattles the bolt and it slides back. As it travels back it pushes against the inertia spring and once compressed all the way, the spring pushes back in turn the bolt travels forward. This system is used instead of letting gas or the initial explosion drive the bolt back. And, since the gases can’t seep through into the chamber there won’t be any carbon-build up.

Other features include a single-stage trigger that sets off the action with a short pull. It is a three-piece modular design, so it’s easy to snap together and disassemble. The ComforTech Plus Recoil Pad adds comfort and absorbs and dampens recoil. The vent rib acts as a guide leading to the mid-bead and bright red front sight. And, it’s lightweight at around 6.8 pounds. Benelli recommends the Super Vinci for hunting any winged game.

benelli_vinci0119113 benelli_crio_chokes0119114 benelli_inline_inertia0119113 benelli_super-vinci_max0119111 benelli_supervinci_apg0119111

Specifications

26" Barrel
Capacity:3
Sights:Vent rib with mid bead and red bead front sight
Features:Fires magnum loads
In-Line Inertia Driven Operating System; single-stage trigger; and modular design
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/ADP
Synthetic/black
Synthetic/MAX-4
Scope:Drilled and tapped for scope mounts
Type:Semi-auto
Chokes:Cylinder
Full
Improved cylinder
Improved modified
Modified
Website:http://www.benellius…
Weight:6.9 pounds
Barrel Length:26"
Length of Pull:14.375"
Overall Length:48.5"
Drop at Comb:1.375"
Drop at Heel:2"
Bore:2.75"
3"
3.5"
28" Barrel
Capacity:3
Sights:Vent rib with mid bead and red bead front sight
Features:Fires magnum loads
In-Line Inertia Driven Operating System; single-stage trigger; and modular design
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/black
Synthetic/MAX-4
Scope:Drilled and tapped for scope mounts
Type:Semi-auto
Chokes:Cylinder
Full
Improved cylinder
Improved modified
Modified
Website:http://www.benellius…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:28"
Length of Pull:14.375"
Overall Length:50.5"
Drop at Comb:1.375"
Drop at Heel:2"
Bore:2.75"
3"
3.5"
MSRP$1649.00

Editor Review

Much has been made of Benelli’s “revolutionary” shotgun the Vinci and I have to say da Vinci himself would have to look pretty hard at this wonder of measure and harmony to not fall into rank.  The look of this gun took my cohorts and I awhile to warm up to, but any gun that is as beautifully engineered as the Vinci is destined to win me over and I have to concur with the pervading sentiment that this strange looking shotgun is going to be a trendsetter for years to come.  So, is “revolutionary” the word of the day as Benelli would have you believe?  Eh?  Maybe?  I feel that when it comes to the Vinci, a better word is “simplicity.”  

Snapping together the three pieces into each other (that’s right—totally tool-less assembly) makes it feel a little bit like a toy and though I don’t want to mitigate the seriousness of firearms, this gun pretty much has the same fun factor as a toy. The modular system makes thorough cleaning a lot easier as there is no part of this gun you can’t get to with a toothbrush. The lower receiver, trigger group, feeding mechanism and fore-end is all one piece with all the metal parts mounted to a molded polymer frame. Even the magazine tube, usually welded or screwed into place, is easily extractable and slides back into place with a click. A cryogenically tempered the barrel (which is something Benelli’s been doing for awhile now with much success) permanently refines the grain structure of the barrel at the atomic level, which relieves internal stress and “keeps things straight” even after firing thousands of shells.

This in itself doesn’t constitute much deviation from other Benelli models. Things start to get real different, real quick with the bolt, as the barrel and the receiver are all one piece. A single spring powers the entire action, an aspect of Benelli’s new In-Line Inertia Driven® operating system. There are no metal rods through the buttstock to reduce shock. Instead, and unlike previous Benelli shotguns that angle the recoil force back and down into a cup that directs it through the buttstock, the Vinci places the bolt on a guide rod with the recoil spring in the receiver, keeping the recoil linear. This combined with the Comfortech plus means it kicks like an anemic child. 

But really, for all the innovation, it was really just the basic corrections that pushed me over the cliff.  Benelli addressed their shotgun trigger’s reputation of pulling like a compound bow blatantly: the Vinci doesn’t have a shotgun trigger—it has nice light rifle trigger—and it makes all the difference.

In terms of performance it shoots as fast as any semi-auto shotgun I’ve ever fired, had zero failures to feed, is balanced like a fine over-under, and I don’t mind carrying it around all day.  Like any Benelli, the Vinci will cycle 2 ¾ -3” shells, so say you want to go from a duck load to a goose load: pull it back, kick out your duck shell, and cycle in your strategically loaded goose round—takes about a second.

My only criticism is that the case looks ridiculous—looks like something a Bond villain would carry.  Perhaps it’s just a little too European looking for my taste but I have the feeling I’ll be seeing a lot of these cases collecting dust at pawnshops and gun shows in the years to come.