Maverick 88

Description

The Maverick 88 is a series of pump-action shotguns chambered in either 12 gauge or 20 gauge. Maverick Arms is a subsidiary of Mossberg, and the 88 is a less expensive design of the Mossberg 500.

maverick_88security_b1 maverick_88slug_a1 maverick_88allpurpose_a1 maverick_88allpurpose_b1 maverick_88security_a1

Specifications

88 All Purpose 12 Gauge
Capacity:5
Sights:Bead front sight
Features:Cross bolt safety; vent rib barrel; and rubber recoil pad
Most parts are interchangeable with the Mossberg 500
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/black
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Cylinder
Website:http://www.mavericka…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:28"
Overall Length:48.5"
Bore:3"
88 All Purpose 20 Gauge
Capacity:5
Sights:Bead front sight
Features:Cross bolt safety; vent rib barrel; and rubber recoil pad
Most parts are interchangeable with the Mossberg 500
Gauge:20 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/black
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Modified
Website:http://www.mavericka…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:26"
Overall Length:45.25"
Bore:3"
88 Slug
Capacity:5
Sights:Adjustable rifle sights
Features:Also available with a fully rifled bore
Cross bolt safety; vent rib barrel; and rubber recoil pad
Most parts are interchangeable with the Mossberg 500
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/black
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Cylinder
Website:http://www.mavericka…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:24"
Overall Length:43.5"
Bore:3"
88 Security
Capacity:5
Sights:Bead front sight
Features:Cross bolt safety; vent rib barrel; and rubber recoil pad
Most parts are interchangeable with the Mossberg 500
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/black
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Fixed cylinder
Website:http://www.mavericka…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:18.5"
20"
Overall Length:39.5"
41"
Bore:3"
MSRP$226.00

Editor Review

A $200 shotgun? For what? – oh

Shortly after we moved in to our rustic cabin in central Virginia, I was bitten by an opossum.  It was my fault.  My guard was down.  I was wandering around at night.  The opossum was doing what opossums do, I guess, when they aren’t playing dead.  It bit me, and hung off the back of my left foot and chewed on my heel.  I hopped around on the right punching the thing as hard as I could until it let go.  Welcome to the woods!

Opossums aside, our stretch of woods is like a Disney movie.  Whitetail.  Turkey.  Pigs and feral dogs.  Scat from coyote and bear. 

But when I walked out on the deck one morning and was met by an emaciated raccoon, I decided that something had to be done.  And quick.  He was—as Jimbo from Southpark would say—coming right at me.  His little legs were stuck out in front of him and he was slathering like some kind of masked zombie.  The only thing I had at hand was a random piece of 2x4.  I swung for the fence and bopped him off the deck.  Then I went inside and loaded my old S&W .38.  And when I went back outside, the rabid little thing was back on the deck, waiting.

After that, I called in the professionals.  I described my dilemma, but the good folks at Animal Control only offered advice.  The old man I talked too wasn’t terribly specific – but his point was clear.

“You got you some of them nocturnal animals whats out in the daytime,” he said, “dispatch ‘em.”

I wish I had recorded the conversation.  The way he drug out the word dispatch – maybe I’m a bit old-fashioned – but I guess I thought they’d send out the cavalry to rid me of the rabid menace.

“You best get you a weapon,” he said, firmly establishing that this was my problem – not his.  “You got a weapon?” 

I had my old .38, which works wonders if the raccoons agree to sit still, like the one on the deck.  But it is less effective if they’re moving.  Maybe I am less effective when they’re moving.

“Get you a shotgun,” he said.

“Right,” I said.

And that was that.  At the time, my son was two.  He’d just developed an intense interest in animals and an ability to open some doors.  The raccoon on the deck had friends.  And they were just as likely to hang out in the daytime and show no fear of humans.   

So I put the boy in the minivan and we went to Wal-Mart – the only place within 60 miles that sells guns. 

I don’t know if you have ever been gun shopping with a two year old boy.  It isn’t easy.  And Wal-Mart has an annoying habit of putting the toys and the sporting goods close together.  So the boy had little interest in stopping at the gun counter, and no desire to discuss the nuances of various weapons. 

So I picked up a Maverick 88.  Maverick is made by Mossberg – a name I had heard, at least.  The 88 is dirt cheap.  12 gauge.  5-shot.  Looked like just what I needed for dispatching some rabid woodland creatures.



Now I should say that I am not terribly qualified to talk about the performance of sporting shotguns.  I’ve been skeet shooting with friends with beautiful, expensive guns.  They dust clays.  As often as I try, I hit nothing. 

And I have no interest in shooting slugs.  Hunting with a shotgun has always baffled me.  No offense to all you slug hunters out there. 

But I’ve always been intimidated by the defensive potential of the 12 gauge.  And, in a perverse sense, that is exactly what I intended for the Maverick 88.  I intended to use the gun in relatively close quarters, between 5 and 50 feet.



And I named it Dispatch.



Satisfaction Guaranteed

I couldn’t be happier with the thing.  It is cheap.  Maverick is a subsidiary of Mossberg, so there are some similarities between the 88 and the Mossberg 500.  But the Maverick is hecho en Mexico – or maybe it is assembled in America from Mexican parts.  I don’t really care.     

Gracias a Mis amigos Mexicanos. 

Shooting

I’d like to take a moment to extol the virtues of the scatter gun.  I had no time to practice.  No problem.  The Maverick dispatched the varmints with a gruesome efficiency.  The gun hit what I looked at.   Aiming felt oddly instinctual.



In the first week I owned the Maverick, I killed six raccoons—all of them in daylight hours.  All were sick.  After that, things quieted down.  Our sprawling wilderness has returned to its idyllic splendor.

And now I have a shotgun.  I’ve put more than a thousand rounds through it.  I’ve shot low brass, high brass, magnums and even some slugs, just for the hell of it.  The gun takes them all and has never had a single problem.  And the pump cycles loudly, which I like.

Some complain about the placement of the safety (which is near the trigger).  The controls are unapologetically right handed. 

I hadn’t noticed until my left-handed nephew had some troubles.  Otherwise, there is nothing to complain about.  The synthetic stock is basic.  The finish is sufficient.  The function is flawless.

And I have plans.  I bought a 28” Maverick, and I’d really like to have it shorter.  That’s what’s so beautiful about a gun like this.  If I screw it up, I usually screw something up.  And I’ll tinker with the stock.  If I mess it up, it has served its purpose well.  And I’ll have a parts gun.  Because I’ll go right back out and buy another.

The Maverick’s charm is it’s affordable efficiency.   It’s the firearm equivalent of a BigMac.  Or maybe a BigMAc served by a McDonald’s in Mexico City.  Whatever.  It’s fast food.   

Don’t get me wrong—I love a good shotgun.  One of my best friends has a prewar Browning Auto-5.  I owned an old Winchester 1897 12 gauge riot gun once, briefly, and I miss it still.  Both are works of art and shotguns.  And I would never toss either into the bed of a pickup.  I would never take either shooting with my students from the college.

The maverick?  Not so artistic.  But it is a shotgun.  And to that end, it does what shotguns do best.



Check out what others say about the Maverick 88:

Mossberg Maverick 88 Security 8-Shot Shotgun Review by A Real Man's Objective Review/Gunsumer Report

Maverick 88 Pump Shotgun Review by DrFaulken, Gibberish Is My Native Language