Mossberg 500 Pump-Action All-Purpose Field (VIDEO)

Description

The Mossberg 500 Pump-Action All-Purpose Field is a pump-action hunting shotgun chambered in 12 gauge, 20 gauge, and .410. The 500 All-Purpose Field series comprises seven of 38 Mossberg 500 Pump-Action variants. What makes the All-Purpose Field unique is that it has multiple gauges and barrel lengths, has either a synthetic or wooden stock and is equipped with twin bead sights. The All-Purpose Field is also available with a Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity or matte black finish.

The Mossberg 500 Pump-Action variants share a number of features including an ambidextrous safety and a ported barrel, which reduces recoil and minimize muzzle jump.

As the name suggests, Mossberg considers the 500 All-Purpose Field and “all-purpose” hunting and recreational shotgun.

mossberg_500allpurposefield-d1 mossberg_500allpurposefield-a1 mossberg_500allpurposefield-b1 mossberg_500allpurposefield-c1

Specifications

12 gauge
Capacity:6
Sights:Twin bead
Features:Ported barrel; interchangeable chokes; and cut checkering
Gauge:12 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/matte black
Synthetic/Mossy Oak Break-Up Infinity
Wood
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Full
Improved cylinder
Modified
Website:http://www.mossberg.…
Weight: pounds
7.25 pounds
7.5 pounds
Barrel Length:24"
26"
28"
Length of Pull:13.875"
14.5"
Overall Length:46.25"
47.5"
48.5"
Drop at Comb:1.5"
Drop at Heel:2.125"
2.375"
Bore:3"
20 gauge
Capacity:6
Sights:Twin bead
Features:Ported barrel; interchangeable chokes; and cut checkering
Gauge:20 gauge
Stock:Synthetic/matte black
Wood
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Full
Improved cylinder
Modified
Website:http://www.mossberg.…
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:26"
Length of Pull:13.875"
14"
Overall Length:45.25"
Drop at Comb:1.5"
Drop at Heel:2.125"
Bore:3"
.410
Capacity:6
Sights:Twin bead
Features:Ported barrel; interchangeable chokes; and cut checkering
Gauge:.410
Stock:Wood
Material/Finish:Steel/blue
Type:Pump
Chokes:Full
Improved cylinder
Modified
Website:http://www.mossberg.…
Weight:6.25 pounds
Barrel Length:26"
Length of Pull:14"
Overall Length:43.75"
Drop at Comb:1.5"
Drop at Heel:2.125"
Bore:3"
MSRP$375.00

Editor Review

Why I Need a Gun

Around Christmastime one year when I was living in Wisconsin and before I owned a shotgun my boss walked right up to me and asked, “What do you have planned for Friday?”

I thought he was going to ask me to work a few extra hours. At the time I was looking to get promoted, so I was willing to do a lot more for the company. I said, “Nothing.”

“Good,” he said in a somewhat endearing tone. “We’re going hunting. Pheasant hunting. You want to come?”

“Wow!” I thought to myself. I was about to graciously accept his offer too, but the thing is, I’ve never been much of a hunter. The largest game I’d gone after had been squirrels, so I started to say, “I’ve never actually hunted—“ But I saw the enthusiasm slowly drain from his face, so I changed my retort mid-sentence, “—pheasant before.”

His face brightened back up. “Well, than you have to come,” he said and slapped my shoulder. “I’ll pick you up at your apartment at nine. Just give me your address later.”

“Do I need to bring anything?”

“Just dress warm – waterproof if you got it, and bring your shotgun.”

I said, “You got it.” But I didn’t own one, so obviously I needed to find a shotgun – a classy one, but reasonably priced because I was on a budget. And because of that, I really thought I’d have my work cut out for me.

Before I began searching gun stores and pawnshops, I had a conversation with a friend who gave me some sound advice, “Get you a Mossberg. I like they’re safeties.” So that’s what I did.

And I nabbed it on my second try at a rather large pawnshop. I bought a used 12 gauge Mossberg 500 All-Purpose for $200.



That’s a Long Barrel…


It looks like something you’d see an old prison guard out in the country carrying while riding atop a horse and watching over a chain gang. This particular model has a 28” vent ribbed barrel and wooden furniture. The barrel and receiver are black, and it also has the aesthetically pleasing gold trigger. Attached to the buttstock is a rubber recoil pad and on the other end are the twin bead sights: a gold middle and a white pearl front.



When resting the butt on the ground, the gun is taller than my waist (I’m 6’2”), but at 7.5 pounds, it really isn’t that heavy. The weight is pretty evenly distributed. Instead of a sledgehammer, it’s more like a broomstick.

Performance


More and more Guns.com fans have been requesting reviews of economical guns, so earlier this summer I took it out to the range to get a better look at it and its performance.



Besides taking down birds, this thing is perfect for destroying paper, clays, and water bottles. Also, birdshot proves to be a nearly effective herbicide.

More importantly, the recoil is very mild whether ones shooting birdshot or buckshot. There are three reasons as to why: recoil pad, barrel porting, and weight.

The recoil pad is about an inch thick and made of soft rubber. The rubber is also vented, so it compresses as the stock pushes against the shoulder. There’s really a lot of give.



The barrel porting releases the gas early, so there’s less mass pushing back.



And weight. The gun weighs 7.5 pounds and is very well balanced. I cannot vouch for the synthetic stock, but the wooden stock is good to go.

The trigger worked exactly how a single-stage trigger should, but the pump was another story. It has dual-action bars meaning the pump is attached to two metals bars, which guide it back. Ideally with two bars it is less likely the pump would bind, but on mine it did stick. However I did figure out how to remedy the problem: just to man up and yank it back. And add a little oil.



With the 28” barrel it was incredibly easy to aim. The mid-sight was just small enough so the front sight seemed to halo it. Also, because the recoil was so mild, my sight alignment barely shifted.





Lastly, I want to say something about the safety. My friend was right about Mossberg safeties. They put their safety switches on the tang, or behind the pistol grip where the action hand’s thumb naturally rests. It’s just really convenient to say the least especially for hunting. It’s easy and quick to engage and disengage.



The Verdict


Well, it’s a better hunting gun than a plinking gun. Mostly because of the length, but any fool could tell you that. I should know because I took out three pheasants when I went out with it. As far as dependability, it’s top notch. You’ll hit what you’re aiming at.