Remington Model 700 SPS Youth

Description

The Remington Model 700 SPS Youth is a bolt-action hunting rifle chambered in .243 Win. and 7mm-08 Rem.

The Model 700 was introduced in 1962 and since then Remington has extended the design into 30 sub-models. The Special Purpose Synthetic Youth is a branch of the SPS model. It uses a synthetic stock instead of the traditional wooden design. However, the Youth model uses a short 20″ free-floated barrel

Remington says the Model 700’s action forms “three rings of steel,” meaning it uses a push-feed action where the bolt pushes the round towards the chamber and the extractor does not grab the rim of the cartridge until the bolt is completely forward and locked. It doesn’t affect the smoothness of the action, but does cater to one’s preference. Some prefer the push-feed action over a control-round feed action (which does the opposite). Also, according to Remington, the Model 700’s receiver was milled from a single piece of steel, so it’ll be more resistant to wear overtime than those not milled from a single piece of steel. A durable receiver is necessary especially when absorbing the force of the initial explosion that sets off heavier loads.

Remington recommends the Model 700 SPS Youth for hunting small game, and leisure shooting.

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Specifications

.243 Win.
Caliber:.243 Win.
Capacity:4
Sights:None
Action:Bolt
Stock:Black synthetic
Material/Finish:Carbon steel/matte blue
Scope:Drilled and tapped for scope mounts
Weight: pounds
6.75 pounds
Barrel Length:20"
Twist:1 in 9.125"
Length of Pull:12.375"
7mm-08 Rem.
Caliber:7mm-08 Rem.
Capacity:4
Sights:None
Action:Bolt
Stock:Black synthetic
Material/Finish:Carbon steel/matte blue
Scope:Drilled and tapped for scope mounts
Weight:7 pounds
Barrel Length:20"
Twist:1 in 9.125"
Length of Pull:12.375"
MSRP$681.00

Editor Review

The Model 700 is the Ford F-150 of the rifle world.  People tend to buy one when they don’t know what else to get and it comes in a bewildering array of configurations and trim levels.  Among those many versions of the 700, Remington produces a low-cost, shortened version that is labeled as a ‘youth’ model.

Here’s the thing about ‘youth’ rifles:  They aren’t just for kids.  The average height of adult women ranges among various populations around the world between 4’11” and 5’5”.  That is average, meaning that a whole lot of them are shorter than that.  Length of pull on the vast majority of production hunting rifles is set up for someone roughly 5’8” tall.  An enormous percentage of the population has to look at ‘youth’ rifles when they are shopping for a weapon that “fits” them to hunt with.

Remington’s youth rifle goes ‘bang’ well enough and is capable of good accuracy.  But it falls short in many other regards.  Compared to most of the 700 line, quality is poor in some ways.  I bought one brand new for my wife a few years ago and right out of the box it was unable to feed the last cartridge from the magazine into the chamber.  Every single time.  The metal work is just slightly off.

The finish is a very cheap matte bluing.  The stock is a cheap plastic thing.  On its website, Remington lists the four ‘key features’ of the 700 Youth.  These include the sling swivel studs and the threaded holes to mount a scope on, which is sort of like crowing about the fact that a truck comes with doors and a steering wheel.

Remington needs to do better than this.  It is one thing to offer a bare-bones deer rifle that is low-cost because the assumption is that the kid is going to grow out of it soon enough anyway.  But a big part of the market for youth rifles is actually shorter adults.  It’s about time that Big Green started producing a higher-quality ‘youth’ rifle than this.