Remington Model 7600

Description

The Remington Model 7600 is a pump-action hunting rifle chambered in .243 Win., .270 Win., 30-06 Springfield and .308 Win.

The Model 7600 uses the Model 870 shotgun’s action and slide, but it is modified to fire centerfire cartridges. The 7600 uses a rotating bolt, which rotates when the firing pin punches forward and then the shooter must pull the slide back to reverse action and reset the pin. The 7600 has a free-floated barrel that ensures the stock won’t interfere with the barrel’s action. The 7600 comes standard with iron sights and is available in 2 stocks: walnut and synthetic.

The Model 7600 is currently used by law enforcement in Europe. Remington recommends Model 7600 for hunting hoofed animals and larger game.

remington_m7600_1231101 remington_m7600_synthetic_1231101

Specifications

Standard
Caliber:.243 Win.
.270 Win.
.30-06 Springfield
.308 Win.
Capacity:4
Sights:Iron sights
Features:Free-floated barrel; and, quick release magazine
Action:Pump
Stock:Walnut
Walnut high gloss
Material/Finish:Polished steel/blued
Website:http://www.remington…
Weight:7.5 pounds
Barrel Length:22"
Twist:(.243 Win.) 1 in 9.125"
1 in 10"
Length of Pull:13.5"
Overall Length:42.75"
Drop at Comb:1.1875"
Drop at Heel:2.25"
Synthetic
Caliber:.243 Win.
.270 Win.
.30-06 Springfield
.308 Win.
Capacity:4
Sights:Iron sights
Features:The 30-06 Springfield has the 18.5" barrel; rubber recoil pad on the butt stock; free-floated barrel; and, quick release magazine
Action:Pump
Stock:Black synthetic
Material/Finish:Steel/blued/matte
Website:http://www.remington…
Weight:7.5 pounds
Barrel Length:18.5"
22"
Twist:(.243 Win.) 1 in 9.125"
1 in 10"
Length of Pull:13.5"
Overall Length:(.30-06 Springfield) 39.125"
42.75"
Drop at Comb:1.1875"
Drop at Heel:2.25"
MSRP$792.00

Editor Review

Pump action rifles are curious things in most parts of the United States and indeed in many parts of the world.  We usually associate that action type with shotguns.  Among pump action rifle designs, the 7600 (and its very similar predecessor, the model 760) is hands-down the most dominant design on the market.

The 7600 tends to appeal to two groups of people.  First, to those who have trained extensively with pump action shotguns and find that when it’s time to make something go ‘bang’ under pressure, their left hand is just going to try to pump a slide.  I have personal experience with this, having found that years of shooting clays with a pump action shotgun have rendered me totally unable to produce a follow-up shot with a semi-automatic  shotgun.  When deciding to move up to a rifle, many law enforcement officers who spent years with a shotgun in the trunk of a patrol car will be more comfortable shooting a 7600 than they are with a semi-automatic rifle.

Then we have a broader category of people who live in areas that prohibit either possession or hunting with a semi-automatic rifle.  For example, hunting deer with any semi-auto is illegal in the state of Pennsylvania.   Many of Pennsylvania’s million-plus deer hunters prefer to have a very quick follow-up shot in case an animal is wounded and they find that a pump action rifle is the next best thing.  For this reason, the 7600 is a common sight in the Pennsylvanian woods, while I have yet to encounter a hunter with one in my home state of Virginia.

When a semi-auto is off the table a pump action is not a bad compromise.  The sliding action makes it easy to keep the target in your sights while chambering another round.   Contrast this with a bolt-action rifle, which is very awkward to avoid having to re-acquire the target in a scope after the first shot.

While the 7600 is the heir to the 760, mechanically it owes a great deal to Remington’s model 7400 semi-automatic rifle.  In fact, it could be described as essentially a model 7400 which has had its gas tube removed and replaced by the pump system of the 870 shotgun.  Accuracy is typically better than similarly-priced semi-autos and most owners seem to agree that the 7600 can match the accuracy of most of Remington’s off-the-shelf bolt action rifles.

The gun is available in many different configurations ranging from short-barreled tactical carbines for police departments, to handsome walnut-stocked deer rifles.  It has been offered in many chambering in the past, but is currently offered to the public only in .243, .270, .308 and .30-06.  If you keep a close eye on the used market, you can still find them in .35 Whelen, which will set you up nicely for both elk and deer in one package.