DIY silver bullet making (VIDEOS)

Grant Thompson, the “King of Random,” coupled with Cody’s Lab to melt down some scrap silver coins using a mini-electric arc furnace then proceeded to cast some werewolf stoppers.

The end result, using a cast made from 124-grain FMJ 9mm bullets, produced a much lighter 94-grain fine silver bullet that they seated to the same cases. In case you are curious, 94-grains of silver equals about 0.214857 ounces and with the current melt weight spot cost of silver is $19.77 per oz, meaning each projectile had about $4.25 worth of precious metal.

Once created, they proceeded to waste that beautiful silver on some paper werewolf targets (remember, always wear earpro). Either way, these guys watch too much TV.

The bullets didn’t mushroom much and penetrated a creosote pole backstop nearly intact. In the end, at least they were able to recover them.

Cody reclaimed his silver using a thermite reaction technique outlined below from silver oxide. Though it was less impressive.

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