Gun control group makes past NRA grades an issue

06/21/18 8:30 AM | by

Gun control group tries to make past NRA grades an issue

Both sides of the gun rights debate often tout their grades from the NRA, such as the above shown on the lapel of U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, a Democrat from Kentucky who has backed a number of gun control proposals. (Photo: Rep. Yarmuth)

Both sides of the gun rights debate often tout their grades from the NRA, such as the above shown on the lapel of U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, a Democrat from Kentucky who has backed a number of gun control proposals. (Photo: Rep. Yarmuth)

The practice of issuing grades to lawmakers over their stance on gun policy has become a double-edged sword of sorts.

For a decade the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action has been grading lawmakers and political candidates at the federal and state level over their position on gun rights issues. The grades, from A through F mimicking school report cards, are formulated through past votes while in office on legislation concerning gun regulation as well as surveys sent to declared candidates by the organization.

While the Second Amendment powerhouse is still actively circulating questionnaires, releasing endorsements and publicly posting current grades, Everytown is crying foul that the organization has apparently pulled access to past years’ ratings for undetermined reasons.

Revealed by a recent Washington Post article, the newspaper said an unnamed NRA staffer suggested the move came because enemies of the group were using the grades to their advantage.

“An NRA A-rating has gone from a badge of honor to a scarlet letter,” argues Everytown President John Feinblatt, whose own group has posted what they contend are archived NRA grades going back to 2009. “The political landscape has shifted, and voters are demanding leaders from both parties stand up to the gun lobby or find another job.”

While the group formed by billionaire anti-gun crusader Michael Bloomberg holds the ratings are an albatross for some lawmakers, many conservatives embrace their high-ranking grades.

“I am proud to receive an ‘A’ with the NRA,” said Georgia state Sen. Hunter Hill, who ran for the GOP nomination for governor this year. “They are our nation’s leading 2nd Amendment advocacy organization, and I thank them for their continued work to defend every American’s God-given right to protect themselves, their property, and their family.”

On the other hand, progressive candidates often take advantage of their own basement-level grades from the NRA, using them as a sort of backhanded verification of their gun control creds.

Six-term Kentucky Democrat U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, like all members of the House, is running for re-election this year and has taken to wearing his “F” rating on a lapel pin since March.

His move was picked up by other career Dems, such as New York’s Gregory Meeks and Nydia Velázquez, both of which have represented urban New York City-area districts for decades and have long-backed various gun bans and firearm regulation bills.

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