The Carbine Consistency Drill exposes fast, sloppy shooting (VIDEO)

Aaron Barruga, the founder of California training company Guerrilla Approach, said he created the Carbine Consistency Drill for two reasons. “One, I wanted to be able to encourage speed while teaching offset and two I wanted to challenge that it’s okay to be sloppy when close to your target,” Barruga said in a video introducing the drill. He added he wanted the drill to challenge shooters on both speed and accuracy.

Although the drill is shot at the 5-yard line, it uses Barruga’s consistency target, which is a mix of small squares and large rectangles. The design creates very small margins for error and requires shooters who want to go for speed to see the entire target.

Barruga designed the drill to challenge both speed and accuracy. (Photo: Chase Welch/Guns.com)

For the drill, the shooter fires 18 shots moving left to right and top to bottom, and needs to put a single round into each small square and two rounds into each rectangle. The goal is to complete the drill in 12 seconds. You score the drill by adding one second for each miss.

This drill offers a lot of great lessons like learning to adjust point of aim based on distance, and learning to speed up or slow down rate of fire while maintaining accuracy.

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