Clay shooting is one of the best disciplines to get into as a new shooter, but it can be pricey. Even beginner or budget over-under shotguns typically start at about $1,000. Over-unders can range up to $5,000 or even $20,000, so I was excited to see the Stevens 555 Sporting pop up on my radar with an MSRP of $991. 

Stevens has been a mainstay in this category for decades. If you are not familiar, Savage Arms absorbed Stevens back in the 1940s, but the Stevens name is still used to this day. Stevens is known as a no-frills line of long guns that has gathered quite the fan base over the years. Many shooters had a Stevens shotgun as their first firearm. They have been proven durable, reliable and affordable. 
 

Table of Contents

Video
Meet the 555
Features
At the Range
Specifications
Final Thoughts

Video

 

 

Meet the 555

 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
The 555 Sporting offers features not often seen in budget clay shotguns, including a center sight bead on the vent rib and a reinforced breech. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


The 555, like many budget shotguns, is made in Turkey by KOFS and imported by Savage Arms. When considering a budget over-under, the first things to think about are fitment and reputation. As Turkish shotguns fill the budget shotgun space, it can be difficult to wade through the waters and figure out what options are best. With a company like Savage backing the legacy, I’d trust the Stevens name over some of these newcomers any day. 

The 555 is offered in a few different models and gauges. For this review we were able to acquire a 12-gauge 555 Sporting model. The Sporting is geared toward shooting sporting clays and trap, featuring a reinforced breech and a raised vent rib.
 

Features

 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
A raised vent rib with fiber-optic front sight and a center brass bead make it easy to pick up your target. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


The raised vent rib is perfect for skeet and trap. It even has a center bead. That simple brass bead located in the middle of the vent rib is incredibly helpful in ensuring you have an even sight picture. Though having a center bead might seem like a simple thing, many budget shotguns do not offer this feature. 
 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
Porting on the barrels is another welcome upgrade. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


To sweeten things up even more, the twin 30-inch barrels sport porting. Accuracy was only an issue of the user, as I tested this shotgun through multiple courses of fire. 

In the box you’ll find an array of extended choke tubes, offered in five different sizes. This kit has everything you’ll need to get started. As a beginner clay shooter, one can run down an expensive rabbit hole of choke options, so having a handful of extended tubes from the factory is a nice benefit.
 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
The 555 Sporting offers classic good looks with its walnut furniture and silver aluminum alloy receiver. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


In terms of aesthetics, the walnut finish and silver aluminum receiver offer a classic look. The finish on both stock and barrels held up very well over the course of several range days. 
 

The checkered grips are comfortable and secure while swinging to pick up clay targets. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)

 

At The Range

 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
I had no issues and quite a bit of fun with this gun over the course of several range days. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


During my tests, the 555 endured multiple rounds of sporting clays, skeet and trap shooting. This was a fun gun! I’d say about 400 rounds total were spent, ranging from super-handicapped 1,300 feet-per-second Winchester AAs to 1,170 fps White Box rounds. During that time, zero malfunctions occurred, and as it broke in, the action became pleasantly easier and smooth. 
 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
Spent shells must be removed by hand, but I actually like this feature better than auto-ejectors. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


This shotgun offers extractors, meaning it is up to you to pluck out used rounds. Surely this was chosen to help keep costs down, but I actually prefer to avoid the surprise of ejectors shooting out spent shells. 

Although on the lighter side, the gun carried very well through transitions on pairs. Hitting one clay and swinging over for the next was both easy and comfortable. This shotgun is easy to pick up and aim, making it great for beginner and experienced shooters alike. 
 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
The adjustable cheek riser is another upgrade I was pleasantly surprised to find on the Sporting model. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


The stock mounts comfortably, and looking down the vent rib feels natural. Should you want to make an adjustment to the cheek comb, that is an option, something you’ll typically not see on a budget over-under. In a game where fitment is key, features like this can be the difference between crushing clays and missing them. 
 

Specifications

  • MSRP: $991
  • Action: Over/Under 
  • Caliber: 12 gauge 
  • Barrel length: 30 inches 
  • Barrel material: Carbon steel 
  • Chamber: 3 inches 
  • Receiver material: Aluminum 
  • Stock material: Turkish walnut
  • Length of pull: 14.57 inches 
  • Weight: 6.84 pounds
  • Choke tubes: Extended (F, IM, M, IC, C)

 

Final Thoughts

 

Stevens 555 Sporting 12-gauge over-under shotgun
With multiple upgrades at a budget price point, the 555 Sporting would be a great purchase for a beginning clay shooter or anyone who's into scatterguns. (Photo: Taylor Abney/Guns.com)


Overall, I was incredibly impressed with the 555 Sporting and would recommend it to both newer shooters and hunters alike. To put it simply, it looks good, performed well, and has a slew of features packed into a budget price point. This over-under shotgun is perfect for those who want to take it to the range, join a local league, or go upland hunting with no worries.

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