Looking for some surplus ammo from a defunct Eastern Bloc state? Well, you’re in luck because Guns.com has just fallen into some wonderful 7.62x39 from the former government of Yugoslavia! These are M67 loads with 124-grain FMJ bullets loaded into annealed brass cases. All the ammo in these cases is loaded onto 10-round SKS stripper clips. All of that equals a huge upside on a number of different levels. Let’s dig into why.
 

RELOADABLE AND RANGE SAFE
 

Yugoslavian 7.62x39 ammo
The ammo is range safe and reliable. (Photo: Samantha Mursan/Guns.com)


Because this is brass cased, it means that you’ll be able to reload if you have the proper tools. Although it will be harder to find parts and tools to reload this ammo because it uses Berdan primers. However, if you have the parts and primers available that is certainly a huge plus for all those range chickens out there who like to collect cases. A lot of indoor ranges also forbid the use of steel-cased and steel-core ammo. Because this is brass, you’ll never have to worry about that, another huge win for this old Yugoslavian ammo. 
 

SKS ARE READY TO FEED


Inside each case, you’ll find a "spam can." Inside that, you’ll find 28 boxes, each holding four 10-round stripper clips. This is perfect if you already have an old SKS laying around that you want to take to the range to plink with. If you’re more of an AK guy, however, and you have a little time on your hand, the ammo is easily taken out of the stripper clips for use in any standard AK magazine. Either way, at the end of the day, you’ll have 112 leftover stripper clips that will be perfect for your next crafting project!
 

Yugoslavian 7.62x39 ammo in crate on stripper clips
The pre-installed stripper clips should be a welcome sight for anyone with an SKS. (Photo: Samantha Mursan/Guns.com)

 

IS IT CORROSIVE?


Yes, this ammunition is corrosive, much like most military surplus ammo. While there is a negative connotation around corrosive ammo, shooters shouldn’t be worried to use it if they simply clean their gun after shooting. It should be noted that this means soaking and scrubbing all parts of the gun in hot and soapy water before cleaning with traditional solvent and applying lube. These cleaning procedures are standard practice for militaries using corrosive ammo. If the gun is kept clean, it's kept happy, and corrosive ammo won’t ever be an issue.

CONCLUSION


Despite the recent ban on imported Russian ammo by the Biden administration, 7.62 will continue to be manufactured. However, the supply and quality could vary in the coming years. If you’re an AK or SKS lover, then this is an excellent chance to jump on some good-quality ammo at a better-quality price. 

These 1,120 rounds are sure to be a joy to shoot. When you’re all done, you’ll have a really cool, albeit slightly worn, green wooden box complete with yellow-stenciled Cyrillic script – That's a great addition for any man cave!  
 

7.62 x 39 ammo in warehouse
When finished, the ammo crate makes a handsome addition to any man cave. We may have bought a few of these, but they are going fast. So don't wait to get yours! (Photo: Samantha Mursan/Guns.com)

 

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