Known chiefly for its lever-action rifles, Henry has now entered the six-gun game with a pair of Big Boy .357 Magnum revolvers – while more wheel guns could be on the way.
 
With an iconic name that dates to the 1800s, Anthony Imperato's reborn Henry Repeating Arms has been making lever guns since 1996 when its first H001 Classic Lever Action .22 hit the market. Since then, the company has made its way to its new headquarters at Rice Lake, Wisconsin, and employs over 600 American workers. These days, not counting limited editions and special editions, Henry catalogs no less than nine Classic Rimfire lever gun models, seven Golden Boy lever guns, 10 Big Boy lever guns, 14 Large Frame lever guns, three Long Ranger levers, and a trip of classic Original Henry models.
 
Now, entering new territory, Henry has a six-shot double-action/single-action medium-frame revolver chambered in a satisfying .357 Magnum.
 

the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The Big Boy revolver is classically styled, with a highly polished blue steel frame and barrel, set off with a mirror-bright brass trigger guard and backstrap assembly. (All photos: Chris Eger/Guns.com)
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
It uses a 4-inch barrel, giving it an overall length of 9 inches. Henry offers the Big Boy revolver with a squared "Gunfighter" grip, shown, or a more cowboy-style Birdshead grip with much the same specs – with the exception that the squared grip gives the revolver an extra half-inch in overall length and an extra ounce in weight.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
Weight, overall, is 35 ounces, unloaded.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
Chambered for .357 Magnum, the Big Boy can also accommodate .38 Special rounds.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The Big Boy revolver is meant as a complementary wheel gun to the company's popular Big Boy Brass Side Gate rifle, which carries an octagonal  20-inch blued steel barrel, American walnut furniture, and a polished hardened brass receiver. Likewise offered in .357/.38, it has a 10-round capacity via its underbarrel tube magazine and an MSRP of $1,124.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The Henry Big Boy revolver is roughly akin in size, nomenclature, and manipulation to a 4-inch Smith & Wesson K-frame, for instance, the Model 64 shown. Like the Smith, the Big Boy uses a left-hand cylinder rotation, has a right-hand side plate to the frame, and a push-forward release button to the rear of the cylinder on the left side of the frame.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The six-shot cylinder even has the same pattern as a K-frame, and accepts standard speedloaders (HKS 10, Safariland J-K2C, 5 Star K6) for the type, a 5 Star model shown. As this is probably the most common speedloader pattern, this is a smart move by Henry. Also, note the cutout in the grips for the use of a speedloader. The Birdshead grip also has a similar cutout.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The unshrouded ejector rod under the barrel, meanwhile, is very 1920s-1960s Colt. It is stout and, barring a meeting with a hammer, is unlikely to bend. Note the Rice Lake, Wisconsin, rollmark. Everything Henry makes is made in America, and the company only uses U.S.-sourced components. 
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The crane has a strong lockup and the gap between the forcing cone and cylinder is tight.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
 The barrel is screwed in, isn't pinned, and the cylinder is not recessed. Likewise, there is no manual safety lock as seen on many new S&Ws and most new Taurus revolvers. The action uses a transfer bar safety system. Note the screw for the backstrap module, which means at some point Henry could simply offer the different grip styles to owners to swap out rather than making them separate revolvers.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
Note the curious mainspring system, which is independent of the backstrap and a little different from either a Colt or Smith but looks sort of like that on a Ruger GP100.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
Despite the unusual (when compared to contemporary) mainspring system, we found the Henry Big Boy revolver to have a manageable and consistent 9.5-pound double-action trigger pull and a nice 3.75-pound single-action pull.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The Big Boy uses traditional revolver sights via a fixed notch cut directly into the frame and a ramped blade front sight.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
However, Henry has gone the extra mile to allow easy adjustment of the front sight via three included sizes that ship with the revolver, allowing the user to tweak the point of aim to match the point of impact.
 
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The walnut grip panels are smooth except for the Henry Rifleman logo. We've tried several Smith and Colt grips on hand for fitment and can't find a compatible pattern, which may mean the Big Boy is limited in terms of replacement panels to Henry's e-story.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
In a nod to what may be coming, the manual for the Big Boy revolver includes lots of references to a 10-shot .22 LR/.22 WMR variant (H016) which is in the same format but chambered for rimfire. Just in time for Christmas?
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
So far, we have put about 100 rounds of mixed .357/.38 through the Henry Big Boy series – revolver and rifle – and will have a full review on both in the coming weeks.
the New Henry Big Boy 357 Revolver
The MSRP on the new Henry Big Boy revolver in .357 Magnum is $928.
 
revolver barrel loading graphic

Loading