A series of innovatory rifle and carbine technology patents filed by Glock has been surging through the gun webs this week, causing a stir. About that. 

On the eve of each new Glock product release over the past several years, there is a palpable rumor whispered in the corners of gun shops, firing ranges, and firearms distributor offices that, possibly, hopefully, maybe, the Austrian-based power polymer pistol maker is going to take the plunge into the carbine market. Heck, it is something that has been talked about on Glock fan boards for over a decade. 

"Now that would be a game-changer," comes the response, followed by, "Just give the people what they want," and "I probably won't buy one, but they'd sell a million the first year alone."
 

SHOP GLOCK!


Then the big reveal turns out to be a .380, or a .380-sized 9mm, or a .380-sized 9mm with a better magazine capacity, or a .22LR pistol, or a crossover G17 with a G19 top half, or a crossover G17 with a G19 top half in black

Whomp, Whomp.  

But now there may be a little fire behind that smoke column as Sparanat, a German gun and gear blog, this week published extensive coverage of a series of carbine/rifle system patents filed by Glock in a piece titled, "Es Kommt! Das Glock Sturmgewehr."

Sparanat followed it up with an English language video about the filings. 
 


All of this was duly picked up by the likes of Recoil, TTAG, and others. 

Now breathe. 

The fact is that, yes, a simple search of patents assigned to Glock Technology Gmbh over the past two years shows several for carbine systems logged originally with the European Patent Office. World-wide applications filed on behalf of inventors Elmar Bilgeri, Mario Kastrun, Josef Kroyer, Siegfried Sereinig, and Andreas Wutte, were registered by Glock in Austria, using the company's Gaston Glock Park 1, 9170 Ferlach address

Of interest, Bilgeri has a long history of firearm patents dating back to the 1990s with Steyr and is credited as being one of the minds that brought Col. Jeff Cooper's Scout Rifle concept to life.  

Now for the patent drawings, which detail an adjustable gas block, a short-stroke gas piston system with operating rod, ambidextrous magazine well for STANAG-style AR mags, a bolt assembly with a charging handle, and a barrel with a supported barrel extension. 
 

Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.
Glock Carbine Patent
Via Glock's patent application.


So, what does it all mean? Possibly nothing. As part of an R&D process, companies regularly take out patents on new inventions. Does that mean a finished product will ever come to market? No. However, it does appear that Glock is very open to the concept of making long arms and has a talented and experienced team in Austria that has been burning lean muscle tissue into the night to make the dream a reality.

Stay tuned.

SHOP GLOCK!

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