A relatively unknown brand, with a whole new platform, at an incredibly enticing price point – that’s GForce Arms with the LVR410. Turkey is building a reputation as one of the largest shotgun exporters in the world, and GForce is leading the way for Turkish-built lever-action shotguns. Before you pull the trigger – literally and metaphorically – there’s more you’ll need to know.  
 

Table of Contents 

Video Review
Meet the GForce LVR410
About GForce Arms
Hands On the Test Gun
The Extended Family
Field Notes
About That Break-In
Working Out the Kinks
Conclusion

Video Review

 

 

Meet the GForce LVR410

 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
Our test gun came in a color-case-hardened finish with hardwood stocks, featuring a large loop lever and contoured receiver. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


The GForce LVR410 is the model name for a lineup of .410-bore lever-driven shotguns. At its root, the guns can be had with two barrel lengths. With full-length magazine tubes, the 20-incher accepts 7+1 rounds, while the 24-inch barreled version packs a whopping 9+1 round capacity of 2.5-inch shells. The base model guns are built on an aluminum receiver and dressed in uncheckered Turkish walnut furniture. 
 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
The LVR410 features a HIVIZ front sight ... (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)
GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
...and GForce's open rear rifle-style sight. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


Each LVR410 ships in a sleek hard case, accompanied by a set of three Benelli Mobil-style choke tubes packed in a smaller hard case along with a choke wrench. There’s a HIVIZ front sight and what the company calls an “open” rear that is more of rifle-style system. In terms of safety, the LVR410 uses both a rebounding hammer safety and an incidental lever safety that requires the lever to be fully closed against the tang before firing.  

In addition to matte black, nickel silver and case-colored aluminum receivers, the company offers a tactical-dressed Huckleberry lineup featuring numerous color variants. Retail pricing on the base model opens from $699, but cost varies greatly depending on the specific model. 
 

Related: Unboxing a GForce LVR410: Budget-friendly Lever Action
 

About GForce Arms

 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
GForce Arms has made a name for itself as one of the premier importers of budget-friendly Turkish-made shotguns. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


To fully understand the new shotgun, let’s take a closer look at the folks behind the name. GForce is a Reno, Nevada-based company importing Turkish-made firearms. Shooters in the more tactical crowd may recognize the brand for their pocketbook-friendly semi-automatic and pump actions, namely bullpup designs. 

For those unfamiliar, GForce shows off a transparent web presence, with a thorough website and clear customer service information. Though their name is certainly lesser known than most others in the lever gun world, these folks are not new to the industry. One final comfort is the warranty. The LVR410 is backed by a limited lifetime warranty, albeit only for the original owner. 
 

Hands On The Test Gun

 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
The receiver's color-case-hardened finish adds aesthetic appeal. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


Our test gun comes as brand-new stock directly from the GDC Vault. We opted for the color-case-hardened finish with hardwood stocks. The large loop lever and contoured receiver add to aesthetic appeal. The barrel on our test gun is the longer 24-incher, lending an overall firearm length of 43 inches. 
 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
A thick rubber recoil pad means length of pull is just over 14 inches. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


The length of pull is suitable for a long reach at 14.25 inches with the thick rubber recoil pad. The LVR410 weighs in at an even 6 pounds empty but gains significantly when loaded to the full 10-round capacity. 

While prices vary by mode, our gun – exactly as it came from GDC Vault – is on sale for $609.99 at the time of this writing. There are variants from the mid-$500s up to nearly $900.  Those prices make GForce’s lever-action shotguns one of – if not the most – the affordable new production options on the market. That’s especially true when considering the included extras (cases, chokes, and wrench). 
 

The Extended Family


Though our case-colored variant has a classy, traditional look, GForce offers a full family of lever shotgun offerings. There are matte-blued or nickel-silver-coated receivers paired with the walnut dress. 

The Huckleberry series takes lever actions in a modernized direction with the addition of an M-LOK forend, upper and lower picatinny rails, and a skeletonized buttstock that features vertical ammunition storage clips. 
 

Related: New Huckleberry 'Tactical' Lever-Action Shotgun


The Huckleberry – bonus points for creative naming – is available in an array of drab-colored finishes, an abstract camouflage pattern, and a snappy red, white, and blue number. 

The LVR410 has a good number of features in common with fellow Turkish-built value brand TriStar and its recently launched LR94 lever-action shotgun, though most GForce models are marketed at a more affordable price point.
 

Field Notes

 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
We found the LVR410 action to be fairly smooth right out of the box. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


Out of the box, we were surprised to find the action fairly smooth – not necessarily a given on lever actions at lower price points. The grain on our test gun’s walnut stocks was above average, as was the fit and finish. The rifle-style sights are practical and functional, though we’re personally more accustomed to a simple front bead on shotguns, especially if flying or fast-moving targets are common. 

Our LVR410 does not include sling swivels, but we didn’t take issue with that fact, as we rarely shoulder a lightweight scattergun. There is a slight rattle to the lever when the gun is at rest, but this does not affect function. 

We headed to our range with as much varied .410 ammunition as we could muster amid the shortages. The gun does ship with a magazine tube plug in place for limiting hunting capacity, but it’s easily removed by simply unscrewing the threaded end of the magazine tube. 

The LVR410 will accept pretty much any type of 2.5-inch .410 shotshells, be they birdshot, buckshot, slugs, or even the mixed-defense-type loads. We expected a short break-in period, but that proved to be a bit more involved. 
 

About That Break-In

 

GForce Arms LVR410 .410 Lever Action Shotgun
The LVR410 uses a rebounding hammer safety as well as an incidental lever safety that requires the lever to be fully closed against the tang before firing. (Photo: Kristin Alberts/Guns.com)


Though nothing specific is noted in the printed manual, we did study the GForce website prior to loading up our LVR410. There, we found several notes – and video links – regarding the necessity of a break-in period. Giving any new gun a quick cleaning out of the box is always advisable. 

To be fair, GForce factory instructions on the website state, “of course, we ALWAYS advise cleaning your firearm BEFORE you ever go to the range.” Luckily for users, the company provides a clearly demonstrated teardown and reassembly video, something we’d appreciate from more manufacturers. 

All that said, we gave the gun a good cleaning, noting an excess amount of thin lubricant throughout. After reassembly and a proper lube job, we commenced range time. We loaded three rounds at a time, noting at least one failure to feed on each of the first six three-shot groups. There was one failure to fire resulting in a light primer strike, but that issue could not be replicated through the remainder of the 100-plus rounds.
 

Working Out the Kinks

Another point of note regards the lever safety. Most lever actions, including our LVR410, utilize a lower tang safety requiring the lever be fully closed before firing. The difference from many other lever guns, we noted, is that the shooter must mindfully draw the lever of the GForce snugly closed to disengage the safety, a process that becomes muscle memory with some practice. 

Feeding issues continued to get fewer and further between with the next box of ammo. By the time we approached the 100-round mark, the issue of smoothly loading rounds into the chamber seemed to be nearly resolved. We ran predominantly birdshot from Federal, Winchester, and Aguila, though we added in some buckshot from American Tactical and even a few Hornady defense rounds. 

While the break-in period was rather frustrating at times, successfully shooting the LVR410 is quite a hoot. We found it to be accurate on busting stationary clays, soft shooting, and plain fun on the range. The length of pull, especially for me with shorter arms and wearing bulky winter clothing, proved to be rather long. If the gun was mine, I’d trim the stock, but for most shooters, it will likely fit just fine. 
 

Conclusion


At the end of the day, with ups and downs, we’ve made some decisions on the LVR410. The gun should be fully disassembled, cleaned, and lubed prior to any shooting. Buyers ought to expect a break-in period. Because the LVR410 – and all the other .410 levers – chamber only 2.5-inch shells, owners can’t run through some 3-inch magnum loads to accomplish this. 

However, after extensive bench and range time, our gun is running well. For those willing to commit the time and ammunition needed to prepare the LVR410 for regular use, they’ll find it at a bargain in the lever shotgun world. Shooters and hunters desiring a lever-action .410 will be hard-pressed to find one for less, especially with walnut furniture. 

Most competitors, in fact, come in anywhere from $150 to $550 more. At the end of the day, the LVR410 is an aesthetically attractive lever with an appealing price tag, but only buyers willing to commit some effort will appreciate the reward. 

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